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to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do not think it goes far enough. i think it was greenspan that i heard last week said in a discussion panel that a recession as a result of going over the fiscal slope would be a small price to pay to pay back all the
discussion on spending cuts so far. and unless there is, there is a real danger of going off the fiscal cliff. going off the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy, it will cost american jobs. republicans have taken action to avert the fiscal cliff by passing legislation to stop all the tax hikes, to replace the sequester, and pave the way for tax reform and entitlement reform. we are the only one was a balanced plan to protect the economy, protect the american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. but without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it's going to be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it's time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really willing to make. i'll take a few questions. it's been very clear over the last year and a half, i talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budget. where we outline very specific p
, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president, congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernbile] it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernbile] i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we are sensing a different tone in th
, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernible] >> it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernible] >> i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we ar
of the so-called fiscal cliff. boehner said it's time for them to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. republicans complain that for all the talk of coming up with a balanced budget plan, he has made little effort to identify specific proposals beyond increasing taxes on the wealthy. "the white house has not produced any of the balance in the president's described balance proposal that peter roscoe, the house g.o.p.'s deputy whip. boehner and the other house republican leaders will meet on thursday with treasury sec tir tim geitner and the white house's chief congressional li aison to discuss the fiscal cliff. that's the hill newspaper. here's politico this morning, inside the talk, fiscal cliff deal emerging is what some write this morning. and that's from politico this morning. first call up on our question this morning, g.o.p. says address the spending problem and in silver spring, maryland, democrat, good morning anne. caller: yes, well i would like the g.o.p. to be a little more specific because all of them who signed the pledge they want to slink government.
what happens if we go off this fiscal cliff. it's a spending decision and a tax decision, but i list them both up here. this chart comes from the congressional research service. a couple interesting things i want to point out here. first and foremost, if we do nothing, tax increases of about $400 billion, there are going to be spending reductions of about $102 billion, there are some other changes that happen at the end of the year that aren't associated with policy decisions, at the end of the day we change the scope of our deficit by about $607 billion. if we do nothing, that's what makes this such a hard issue to grapple with, mr. speaker, if we do nothing, if we reach no agreement, changes that happen automatically and burden us all in different ways, will create $607 billion for the u.s. treasury that we didn't have before. and that's only half of the annual deficit. you see all the pan damone yum that -- pandemonium folks are describing, all the frightful words used to describe the fiscal cliff, if we roll over that fiscal cliff and all of those bad things come to bear, the tax
in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is the right blueprint. we are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy an
is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar of spending cuts, yet the president wants more revenue and fewer spending cuts. if we fell off the cliff, his plan calls for another round of stimulus spending. you have got to be kidding me. lackshe president's plan is any reform in our entitlement system. the unrestrained growth in entitlement system is driving deficits and driving the debt even higher than the percentage of our gdp. it is estimated to be as high as $128 trillion. even if they confiscate all of the income that excesses $1 million, we cannot pay for the entitlement commitments that the federal government has made. we have made promises to ourselves that we simply cannot keep. without some sensible entitlement reform, our credit rating will be downgraded again. we will become a country that none of us recognize. secondly, fiscal plans failed to achieve their government budget deficit or debt reduction goals. dr. hassett has examined fiscal plans in
in the spending so we in washington and finally address the problem. >> as we continue to try to solve the fiscal cliff, the thing we have continued to look at is our economy. today in the whip's office we will have small family-owned businesses in there and talk about ways to protect the family business, continue to grow while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day as we walk the halls, you continue to ask the questions. the fiscal cliff. we put the offer on the table and the president now has to engage. the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give going. this is the opportunity for the country to lead and opportunity for the president to lead. >> as these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we raise taxes to pay for more spending. this will on
with a plan on how he wants to avert the fiscal cliff. it is irresponsible of us not to deal with the spending issue and simply to push for raising taxes on hard-working american people. many of us come from small- business backgrounds -- family owned businesses. we understand the situation very well. but it isn't -- it is important we not pass this problem along to our children and grandchildren, but we deal with it in a responsible way. the republicans have come forward with a responsible plan and will continue to do that and look for ways to keep us from going over this fiscal cliff. >> we have time for a couple questions before we go to our meeting. >> your colleague has told other colleagues that it is time to vote to extend the middle-class tax cut -- i want to get your take on his comments. more importantly, is this the direction the conference is going? >> i told tom earlier that i disagree with him. he is a wonderful friend and a great supporter of mine, but raising taxes on the so-called top 2%, half as taxpayers are small business owners who pay their taxes with personal income tax
. ♪ host: we will spend about two hours this morning on the "washington journal" talking about the fiscal cliff. we want to start off hearing from you on a different topic. what do you think about hillary clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie
and where it fits in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is the right blueprint. we are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it
. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficient, that does not mean we would not buy on the world market, but if we could meet our needs in the north american markets, almost all of that money comes back to us. we have no better trading partner than canada. nafta has increased the trading capacity of mexico. it has gone somewhere from t
's the first part of the fiscal cliff. the second part of it is the spending decrease that this congress and the president agreed to the last summer to say we dramatically increase spending, we have to reduce that spending. that spending decrease that was agreed to had a deadline by the end of this year. if there didn't there would be across the board cuts. the house passed our spending decreases in may. the senate has yet to pass any. with that we're stuck with across-the-board cuts that will be in early january. and the tax rate for all americans. in 2001 and 2003 and then extended during the lame duck of 2010, every americans' tax rates were extended out to expire the 31st of december. every tax rate from the lowest to the highest is set to go up. some people see the problem is we're not taxing enough and so that solves the problem. to just go off the fiscal cliff and everyone will be taxed more. some say we don't take from some group and give to the other. some say go to the clinton tax rate. we had a booming economy and creating more jobs. if increasing taxes increases economic acti
as the fiscal cliff take effect. bloomberg government hosted a discussion this morning with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen as well as republican senator bob corker and senator mark warner. at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house spear jaub boehner and spoke about the fiscal cliff today. republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. house speaker calling on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit proposal. president obama is at 9:00 eastern followed by speaker boehner. >> this weekend on c-span 3's american history tv, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to japan. >> everybody has their own view what happened and i don't want to argue survival to anyone in japan about the history. we're past that. and my whole purpose for being here is to listen to the living and to do what i can. >> sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 i believe and going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the in
is not insistent on not cutting spending and going over the fiscal cliff. he is out campaigning. last year he was campaigning and he is not being president. he is not negotiating that he said he was going to be, he is campaigning and/or golfing. where is this story? i'm making two cases to the republicans and the democrats who listen. i believe we should have the negotiations on the fiscal cliff. that's two things. $500 billion tax increase, the 2001, 2003 tax cuts lapsing and sequestration of spending restraint. it is a good thing, but saving $100 billion, -- >> not a common republican point of view. a lot of defense cuts. >> the head of the conservative caucus, 60% of most conservative guys in the house, jim jordan said the only thing worst than the sequester would be not having the savings and you saw mitch mcconnell saying we aren't ending the sequester. people are drawing lines in the sand -- let's try to cut to it. >> it has to be on c-span only then would the president have to say and boehner would say your spending cuts are what? cbs and nbc hasn't done that. and he was wandering arou
of this year. then, senator orrin hatch from utah gives the republican address on the fiscal cliff which refers to automatic tax increases and spending cuts that would go into effect in 2013. >> hi, everybody. i'm here on the factory floor of a business in hatfield, pennsylvania, where folks are working around the clock making toys to keep up with the christmas rush. and i came here because, back in washington, the clock is ticking on some important decisions that will have a real impact on our businesses - and on families like yours. the most pressing decision has to do with your taxes. see, at the end of the year, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family will see their income taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. a typical middle class family of four will see their income taxes rise by $2,200. we can't let that happen. our families can't afford it, and neither can our economy. the second option is better. right now, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,
some of wednesday's events regarding the fiscal cliff. tax increases and spending cuts that will go into effect unless congress acts. first, a bloomberg government form. in an hour, president obama speaks to ceo's at a business roundtable. followed by a news conference with john boehner. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. talking about housing issues and the agency's budget. here on c-span at 10:00 eastern. on c-span two, 9:00 a.m. eastern, a news briefing at the pentagon. also, a senate commerce subcommittee on the impact of hurricane sandy and transportation systems in the northeast, on c-span 3 at 10:30 a.m. eastern. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care. all of these have some in the cracks that they are as harmful as the disease is treated. you have to ask, are we hurting people overall on a global level that's what are we doing sometimes? now we have got the report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care. when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the procedures
and the specific spending cuts specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit and avoid the fiscal cliff. we should not put out the hard decisions with gimmicks or triggers. that is what got us here in the first place. at this time to bite the bullet -- it is time to bite the bullet and make the tough decision. the first thing we should do is immediately and eminently extend the middle class tax cuts. this decisive action will ensure that millions of american families do not see a tax cut. -- a tax hike of $2000 in the next two months. we need a long-term solution. most serious plans recommend about $4 trillion to restore the balance. interest savings revives another $600 billion. brining home our troops from iraq and afganistan brings another $800 billion. this plan will strengthen the economy. it will put us on a stable path forward. it must ramp up over time if we will avoid slowing down the economic recovery. 40% of the long-term growth of federal health programs is due to rising healthcare costs. 40%. 60% is due to americans aging. 10,000 americans turn 65 every day. in fact, each and e
the deficit and the fiscal cliff debate. fiscal cliff debate is a tax issue and it's also a spending issue. today we focus largely on the issue of what are we going to do about medicare, a big part of the federal expenditures, an argument is this. we're here to protect medicare for seniors. period. we're not going -- we're not here to cut the benefits for seniors. we're here to see to it that medicare, which has been a program for seniors since 1964, 1965, is going to continue to be there for seniors and the benefits package there. there is changes that can be made to reduce the cost of medicare but not to reduce the benefits. we talked about many of those. and so here's where we're coming. within that area there are very, very significant savings that can be done. the prescription drug benefit. $150 billion over 10 years. other issues having to deal with keeping people healthy to extend their health care. issues having to deal with how much we pay for certain services. fraud and abuse. all of those things could add up to the potential savings -- not to the potential -- to the saving that
and the white house. house republican leaders have made a counter offer to president obama in the fiscal cliff negotiations proposing to cut to true knowledge with a combination of spending cuts come entitlement reform, and new tax revenues. there was a three page letter signed by speaker boehner, majority leader eric cantor, and other senior republicans including representative paul ryan. and this mornings "washington journal," we heard about tax reductions and credits that would go away if the fiscal cliff passes in january. >> board or series looking into the so-called fiscal cliff, we turn our attention to deductions and tax loopholes. some of them are potentially on the chopping block. joining us from the wall street journal is don mckinnon. thanks so much for joining us today. what are the loopholes and deductions? we hear those words a lot, but what are they? guest: loopholes or tax breaks of all different sorts, and whether you like a particular loophole or not depends on where you sit, i guess. there are lots of loopholes that are deductions. deductions are those that most people are
spend too much. that's important when we talk about this fiscal cliff, mr. speaker. this is not about a tax issue. this is a spending issue and this is an issue that folks don't have answers to. you and i serve on the budget committee. one of the things i'm most proud of in my two short years in this body is we looked at the tough challenges. the ones that my colleague from virginia described as being tough, tough choices, you're cutting spending. someone's going to be unhappy. probably would have to be a combination of both. we look at those things. we did on the budget committee. and we came up with a solution. we didn't just tell america who to blame. we didn't about how hard it was and how lousy that is for america's children and america's grandchildren. we proposed solutions. it's represented on this chart, mr. speaker. what i have is debt as a percent of fwpped. the federal debt. that's about $16.3 trillion. i go all the way back to world war ii here where debt was 100% of g.d.p. historical debt represented by this gray line, mr. speaker. this red line, just a different represen
's not a fiscal cliff. the truth is we have a tax decision coming up and we have a spending decision coming up. truthfully, we need more spending decisions coming up. sequester is a new word that we brought up. the sequester, as you recall, mr. speaker, was the hammer that we put in place way back, one of the first big votes you and i took way back in august of 2011. that was part of an agreement that the president wanted to raise the debt ceiling. there were bills that needed to be paid. the speaker of the house, john boehner, said we're not going to expand america's credit card until we get serious about curbing spending. he said, no, mr. president, i will not raise the limit on america's credit card unless you agree to dollar-for-dollar reductions on the spending side of the ledger so that we're not just making the problem worse, we're creating a pathway to solve the problem altogether. i admire the speaker for that. and the speaker and the president agreed on this proposal. it was called the budget control act of 2011, and what it did was to create a -- a committee here on capitol hill, fi
to see us go over the fiscal cliff, but feel very strongly we've got to get serious here. we don't want to increase tax rates. we're not going to increase tax rates. and we want to do something about the spending problem. and remember, the good will, the piece that is, i think, determinive here, the speaker's put new revenues on the table just after the election and said we get it. the president won his re- election. we won ours. we have to now come together. here is our proposal to the speaker -- to the president that we were unwilling to give a year and a half ago. >> they know they need to put revenant on the table, but will you come back and give them the entitlement cuts? >> we will take this as a serious matter. this is not a game. we are interested in trying to solve the problem for the american people so that we do not see taxes go up on anybody, so we can engage in reform, get the economy going again. we're not playing a game. that offer yesterday was not serious. thank you. >> next, nancy pelosi answers fiscal cliff questions. this is about 20 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm h
of three months. what we need to be more focused on is to get through the fiscal cliff and get a deal done and lay the foundation for long-term fiscal reform. it is focused primarily on health care. >> senator, can you wait in on this? cbo, 10-year window, this is a requirement. congress needs to address these things. a roadmap, if you will. should we change the rules before we play the game? >> all of these extraordinary and practical ideas cannot survive in the cbo structure. that is a forcing mechanism. people are grasping onto ideas such as changing the age. people can easily explain it i and understand it instead of doing the more complex and difficult things that would get you where you want to go. i would be interested -- i have always opposed -- >> i did not hear that. >> directive scoring when it comes to cbo. i do think somehow and i think this is the governor's point, which is congress ignores a lot of stuff that makes sense. it gets wrapped up in its day- to-day activities. i honestly think you break out of this is if you get a white house and leadership in congress that are wi
to see us go over the fiscal cliff. we have got to get serious. we do not want to increase tax rates. we want to do something about the spending problem. remember, the goodwill -- the speaker put revenue on the table just after the election. he said, we get it. the president won his reelection and we won our be election. here is our proposal to the president that we were unwilling to give during that negotiation talks last year. >> they know that you put revenue on the table. will you pull back from them and give them some spending cuts question mark -- cuts? >> this is not a game. we are not interested in playing rope a dope. we do not want to see taxes go up on anybody. we want to engage in tax reform and get the economy going. we are not playing a game. that offer yesterday was simply not serious. thank you. >> next, house minority leader nancy pelosi talks to reporters about the so-called the school cliff negotiations. she urged house republican leadership to bring legislation to the floor regarding middle- class tax cuts. this is about 20 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm here today w
a fallback plan for the so called "fiscal cliff", which includes extending tax cuts for the middle class and resuming a fight over spending and taxes for the wealthy later. meanwhile, going overseas, nato makes a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to so
own party some quite comfortable with the sending his party over the fiscal cliff. two 6 ago had a comfortable conversation and the white house. i would say two thanks. despite declines the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have it to its various a barrel spending cuts. secondly, no progress has been made in the talks over the last a of weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for american leadership. it is the way ticket it done until washington. a mature0 lead and a had a meeting with his secretary. it was frank and d -- it was frank and direct. we saw to find out what the president is really willing to do. i remain hopeful that productive conversations can be made it into the it is ahead. elicited a leadership team met with a risk in bull's and leadership is above the business approach the warehouse as an annoyance. i have made clear that we have made the concessions on the line by putting ravenna's up front. many democrats grow up dozens of booklets that must be part of a sensible agreement that
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)